Posts Tagged ‘NHTSA’

Dear NHTSA: Please fix your road rage definition

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010

This is Road Rage Awareness Week in Michigan.

Sounds great, except it’s unclear whether this includes motor vehicle assault against cyclists, pedestrians, or even equestrians.

The National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration defines road rage as an assault with a motor vehicle or other dangerous weapon by the operator or passenger(s) of another motor vehicle, or an assault precipitated by an incident that occurred on a roadway.

Does this even make sense? How does assault with a vehicle occur by the operator of another vehicle?

A different definition of road rage is on the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration (NHTSA) web site.

Road Rage is “an assault with a motor vehicle or other dangerous weapon by the operator or passenger(s) of one motor vehicle on the operator or passenger(s) of another motor vehicle or is caused by an incident that occurred on a roadway.”

Why is road rage limited to assaults on other motor vehicle operators and passengers? Shouldn’t it include motor vehicle assaults against all road users?

The AAA Safety Foundation study Controlling Road Rage defines road rage as “an incident in which an angry or impatient motorist or passenger intentionally injures or kills another motorist, passenger, or pedestrian, or attempts or threatens to injure or kill another motorist, passenger, or pedestrian.”

Again, what about bicyclists?

Governor Jennifer Granholm concluded the Awareness Week resolution by stating, “I encourage all residents of this state to promote the prevention of a dysfunctional act and to be considerate of other drivers.”

How about being considerate of other road users?